Government in pre-election phase is selling ‘folderol’ and ‘pretending it’s substance’

The Australian's Foreign Editor Greg Sheridan says in the pre-election period, the government is "selling a lot of folderol and pretending it's substance".  This comes after the announcement Australia will develop hypersonic missiles alongside the UK and US under the AUKUS arrangement."One thing I think is a slight danger ... is that the government, I think quite intentionally, understandably in this pre-election phase, is giving people the idea that something is actually going to happen about this in the near future," Mr Sheridan told Sky News Australia.  He said he would like the government to answer a few questions."How many missiles are we getting?  When are we getting them?  Why do we have so few missiles?  Why don't we build ground-launched missiles to dominate our northern approaches and so on?  But there are no answers."

The Australian’s Foreign Editor Greg Sheridan says in the pre-election period, the government is “selling a lot of folderol and pretending it’s substance”. This comes after the announcement Australia will develop hypersonic missiles alongside the UK and US under the AUKUS arrangement. “One thing I think is a slight danger … is that the government, I think quite intentionally, understandably in this pre-election phase, is giving people the idea that something is actually going to happen about this in the near future,” Mr Sheridan told Sky News Australia. He said he would like the government to answer a few questions. “How many missiles are we getting? When are we getting them? Why do we have so few missiles? Why don’t we build ground-launched missiles to dominate our northern approaches and so on? But there are no answers.” The Australian’s Foreign Editor Greg Sheridan says in the pre-election period, the government is “selling a lot of folderol and pretending it’s substance”. This comes after the announcement Australia will develop hypersonic missiles alongside the UK and US under the AUKUS arrangement. “One thing I think is a slight danger … is that the government, I think quite intentionally, understandably in this pre-election phase, is giving people the idea that something is actually going to happen about this in the near future,” Mr Sheridan told Sky News Australia. He said he would like the government to answer a few questions. “How many missiles are we getting? When are we getting them? Why do we have so few missiles? Why don’t we build ground-launched missiles to dominate our northern approaches and so on? But there are no answers.”

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