Warning to save water after floodwaters flood Mount Crosby plant

Queenslanders have yet again to mop up the mess.  Image: NCA NewsWire/John Gass
Queenslanders have yet again to mop up the mess. Image: NCA NewsWire/John Gass

Residents in parts of southeast Queensland have been warned to save water after the local sewage treatment plant was hit by the latest flooding.

Muddy floodwaters have inundated the Mt Crosby plant, meaning water treatment is taking longer and impacting capacity.

Southeast Queensland Water has urged residents to reduce their water supply over the next few days. But they say the water is still drinkable and there is no need to boil it.

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“These extreme weather conditions have impacted Mt Crosby’s water treatment plants which are temporarily operating at reduced capacity,” the company said in a statement.

“This is due to floodwaters washing soil and debris into streams and waterways, which drain into treatment plants.

“This is just a precaution. Any reduction in water consumption over the next couple of days will go a long way in managing the water supply during this weather event.

The urgent warning came Saturday night as residents had to mop up damage from the state’s latest flood.

The Gympie and Scenic Rim areas were among the hardest hit by torrential rains, leaving disaster in their wake.

Dozens of flood warnings remained in place on Sunday while a sea wind warning was also issued.

Surf and swell conditions are expected to be ‘hazardous’ and people have been warned against rock fishing, boating and swimming on Fraser Island, the Sunshine Coast and the Gold Coast.

On Saturday, the Mary River was feared to peak at 15m after reaching over 12m on Friday, triggering urgent flood alerts for surrounding areas as rain continued to batter regions.

A major flood warning remains in place for the Mary River in Tiaro and a moderate flood warning for the river in Gympie.

Several roads have been closed across Queensland due to the latest flooding.  Image: NCA NewsWire/John Gass
Several roads have been closed across Queensland due to the latest flooding. Image: NCA NewsWire/John Gass
Residents in some areas have been warned to save water after the impact of a treatment plant.  Image: NCA NewsWire/John Gass
Residents in some areas have been warned to save water after the impact of a treatment plant. Image: NCA NewsWire/John Gass

The Bruce Highway was closed in both directions at Gympie with diversions in place and emergency services warning motorists of delays.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Minister Mark Ryan announced disaster relief on Saturday for 12 local government areas suffering from the flood.

Personal Disaster Assistance will be available to residents of the Lockyer Valley and Southern Downs to cover the costs of immediate essential needs such as food, temporary accommodation, clothing and medicine.

In addition, LGAs in Brisbane, Fraser Coast, Gladstone, Gold Coast, Gympie, Lockyer Valley, Logan, Moreton Bay, North Burnett, South Burnett, Southern Downs and Toowoomba will be able to access disaster relief operations assistance for cover the costs of the immediate cleanup efforts.

Rainfall is expected to ease in Queensland on Sunday with a high of 28C and sunny skies expected in Gympie over the next two days before more rain is expected later in the water.

Meanwhile large parts of southeast Queensland received over 100mm on Thursday and Friday

The largest record was 290mm, which fell on Wilsons Peak, 80km west of the Gold Coast.

– with Lauren Ferri

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